Friday, March 29, 2019

Ten Reasons Why I Thought The Movie, “US” Was Trash (AKA Terrible)




WARNING: This week’s blog is FULL of spoilers

Let’s get this out of the way, I thought Get Out was a fantastic movie. Furthermore, I thought Jordan Peele was incredibly smart to make his directorial debut a horror film about racism.  Because let’s face it – racism is scary.

So it makes sense that I couldn’t wait to see US, the movie.  I found the trailer to be both thrilling and chilling (by the way, that trailer editor should win the Golden Trailer Award – yeah, that’s a real thing).  I bought my tickets online in January, making sure that my boyfriend, his daughter, my mother and I had our favorite seats at The Arclight Theater in Sherman Oaks. I kept checking the rating on Rotten Tomatoes every few days to make sure it was still 100 percent fresh.

Finally, the day had come.  It was time to see US.

The house was packed and buzzing with nervous/excited chattering.  I held onto my boyfriend’s arm as the lights went down and the opening scene-music began. Ten minutes in, I was utterly engrossed, trying frantically to play chess in my head with Peele, determined to figure out the plot-twist before he revealed it at the end of the film.  My heart raced when the red family suddenly appeared at the end of the driveway. Moments later as the red boy shimmied up a tree like a leopard, I heard myself emit a shriek with the rest of the audience. Out loud, I warned the family away from the windows for fear that they would be easy targets for the red family.  But as soon as the red family got inside and the “tethered” Adelaide started speaking, I felt my antennae go up.  It was the same feeling I had when I first heard the details of Jussie Smollett’s alleged hate-crime attack.

Hold up, something isn’t making sense here…

Okay, here are my top ten gripes about US:

1)    When the “Red” Adelaide enters the house for the first time and tells her long, distractingly tedious, “Once upon a time” story about being a shadow, not ONCE does she mention the fact that she is the original Adelaide, a child who was abducted and placed with clones underground, while her “shadow” assumed her life. Don’t you think that would have come up? I mean, wouldn’t that have been the first thing out of your mouth?

2)    This colony of clones or “tethered people”: 

She says the government made them and put them down there, right?  So was the government keeping them there all those years?  If so, how?  And why didn’t they provide actual food for them? Also, if they’ve only ever eaten raw rabbit meat, how are they so athletically superior to regular humans? 

3)    What’s the deal with Jeremiah 11:11? I looked up the Biblical verse, and it still doesn’t make sense.

4)    If the captured-as-a child-Adelaide could move around freely and organize all those clones into a whole Hands-Across-America thing, why the F*%k didn’t she go back above ground and run her little butt back home to her real family?

5)    And speaking of Hands Across America – what was the point of that?

6)    Were some of them ZOMBIE clones?  If not, then why didn’t the white-guy clone die after Gabe delivered a crowbar into his skull?

7)    Why did Peele decide to over-explain some things and not to explain other things AT ALL?

8)    Why did "Red" keep handcuffing or tying up Adelaide when she caught her? Why didn’t she just kill her like she said she wanted to over and over?  (I know, I know, we need "Adelaide" for the sequel, but then throw me some explanation as to why “Red” wants her alive please.)

9)    What was up with Jason and the magic trick? Wasn’t it just a ring made out of a lighter flint?

10)    My biggest gripe:

I was not scared. 

I’m not saying that I didn’t jump a couple of times at the pop-outs, I’m not made of stone.  But I’m saying that it just wasn’t scary. I’m talking about that kind of bone-chilling scary, scared-to-turn-the-lights-out-when-its-time-for-bed scary, scared-to-look-in-the-bathroom-mirror-for-fear-of-seeing-two-reflections scary. 

It just wasn’t scary.

But I do think some people were scared – the critics.  I feel like critics were too scared to pan Jordan Peele’s much-anticipated sophomore effort because Get Out was so innovative, fresh and intelligent. And yes, also because he is mixed-race-black (yeah, I said it) and they don’t want to be on the wrong side of history here.  It’s kind of like that old children’s fable, The Emperor’s New Clothes.  You know the one where the Emperor is fooled into paying for a whole, new invisible wardrobe and all of his subjects are too afraid to admit that they can’t see his outfit, so they praise it instead?


So, in conclusion, I think that the scariest thing about seeing US, the movie, might be admitting to your friends afterward that you just didn’t understand it.

2 comments:

  1. So, I saw US yesterday and was throughly disappointed as well. I'm not going to say it was 'trash,' only because I know that time and effort was put into to getting it done. And, for me, I will get a lot of crap for that. So much of it was just not even feasible and promoting it as a horror film is a ploy. I was never scared or afraid. I might fit into the genre of psychological thriller but I was neither psychologically engaged or thrilled. WTF. I could go on but what's the point? Next.

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  2. I would suggest watching the film multiple times if you don't understand it. No one should walk out the film feeling embarrassed to say you didn't understand because there's a lot to understand in the film. The government question is a fine one, but if we spent time exploring and exposing their time making tethered, the movie would be too long. The real focus of the film are in the themes and we focus solely on Adelaide's life after her tether experience. Yes, we can ask tons of logical questions, but seriously, do you think if you returned home (not being able to really speak either as a kid due to crushed larynx) that your parents would believe it's you over whose been in your place all this time? Also, who uncuffed her from the bed after the swap? How long did it take for her to speak? So fair logical questions, but when talked out, you can see why it isn't viable. Oh and the grand plan...yes we don't know how all this was coordinated but if it took years, I can believe that someone familiar with the surface, could make it happen. Yes, not scary in your traditional sense. This film is more of a social horror that leaves a lot open ended for us to discuss the hidden meanings, potential twist, and themes of the film. Tons of YouTube videos are available to you if you are still confused by a lot. I'm seeing this film a 3rd time and it definitely was better the 2nd time around. Try and give it another go at it without the logical questions and things you'd do. It's a film and just like some things in life, it isn't meant to explained to us, but I understand most ppl can't watch films unless details are explained. Ohh yeah, Hands Across America creeped JP out as a kid..the idea of it at least, not the cause it was for. Imagine ppl holding hands across a long distance...seems creepy and some what culty, but I agree that it wasn't horrifyingly scary of a film.

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